As any parent knows, September can be a hectic time of year as kids return to school, sports and other activities. Juggling schedules is tough, but you don’t have to let your personal fitness suffer, said exercise physiologist, Lauren Conley. 

Exercise Tips for Busy Parents

  • Know yourself. Be realistic with yourself. If you are not a morning person planning a 5 a.m.a workout is probably not a habit you’ll keep. Take a step back and be honest with yourself about what type of exercise routine will work best for you.
  • Block it out. Try making an exercise appointment on your calendar to hold yourself accountable. If you set aside specific times in your planner or family calendar it may feel more like a non-negotiable commitment.
  • Have a plan. Decide on the type of activity or exercise routine you’ll do before your workout so you make the most of your time.
  • Use your lunch break. If you have a job where your schedule allows for it, use your lunch break to get active. Take a walk around the neighborhood or use the facility’s gym if it has one.
  • Make the playground your boot-camp.  No one is ever too old to play outside. If you take my kids to the playground, try to play along with them. Do triceps dips off a bench, incline push-ups, step-ups on the stairs or pull-ups on the monkey bars. The little bursts of activity add up quickly.
  • Take it to the streets. If it’s possible, try walking to nearby activities instead of piling into the car.
  • Track your steps: When all else fails try to count your steps. Whether you use a high-tech fitness watch or a basic pedometer, tracking your steps helps ensure that you stay active all day. Aim for 8,000-10,000 steps per day.

Helping your kids’ through the school week is important, but staying active is just as important to keep mom and dad heart-healthy!

Lauren Conley

Lauren Conley

Clinical Exercise Physiologist

Lauren a clinical exercise physiologist with the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program at Adventist HealthCare Washington Adventist Hospital.

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