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Community Magazine

We are excited to welcome you to Adventist HealthCare & You, a quarterly magazine featuring the health stories of real people in our community that connects you with health care resources at our hospitals and beyond.

Current Issue – Spring 2015

Journey of Hope. That story, upcoming community health classes & events, and more in the Spring 2015 issue of Adventist HealthCare & You magazine. To read, launch the interactive edition of the magazine or browse the articles below.

 

Discovering New Directions in Health Care

Posted by on Aug 21, 2014 in Adventist HealthCare & You | Comments Off on Discovering New Directions in Health Care

Discovering New Directions in Health Care

Adventist HealthCare is Helping Create a Healthier Community. Learn About Four Paths to Wellness Over the last few years, reform to the U.S. health care system has brought about many dramatic changes to hospitals and the care they deliver. Instead of just providing high quality care to the sick within a hospital, today’s health care professionals are focusing more on preventing disease and maintaining health among the entire population, while reducing costs. For Gaithersburg-based Adventist HealthCare, Montgomery County’s first and largest provider of health care services, this change fits well into a focus on community wellness, which began 107 years ago. Adventist HealthCare hosts thousands of community screening and education events each year and is integrating physicians and the larger health care system through modern technology. Here’s more on how Adventist HealthCare’s services are already addressing the changes in health care with a focus on creating a healthier community. Convenient, Quality Urgent Care As the health care system focuses on reducing costs, urgent care centers have grown in popularity. They offer an affordable alternative to emergency room visits for non-life-threatening injuries and illnesses. “We all find ourselves in pressing situations when we need care at a specific time and in a specific location. However, these are often situations that don’t require the expertise and resources of a hospital emergency room,” says Terry Forde, president and CEO of Adventist HealthCare. “Urgent care centers offer that alternative and ultimately are more cost-effective for both the consumer and the provider.” Later this year, Adventist HealthCare will open urgent care centers in partnership with Florida-based Centra Care, which operates 24 centers in central Florida. Centra Care, Adventist HealthCare Urgent Care centers will open in Germantown and Rockville by the end of 2014 and in Laurel in early 2015. Additional locations are planned for the future. Each Centra Care location will feature walk-in appointments as well as online reservations. The facilities also will feature on-site lab work, pharmacy, X-rays, EKGs, physicals and immunizations. Promoting Health at Work Most people spend 40 hours per week—or a third of each weekday—at work. By improving health for employees while they are at work, businesses can save money and boost the population’s overall good health. To support this effort locally, Adventist HealthCare’s workplace wellness affiliate, LifeWork Strategies, has partnered with more than 300 businesses to provide education and wellness programs to employees. Reducing the rates of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension, can help people live healthier and ultimately reduce overall health care costs for businesses. “A healthier workforce lowers costs on health insurance premiums and lowers absenteeism and increases productivity,” says Mindy Pierce, director of LifeWork Strategies. LifeWork Strategies is a member of Adventist HealthCare and delivers integrated wellness and behavioral health programs to a wide range of businesses. Promoting Community Wellness Adventist HealthCare’s rich history in community wellness is the perfect match to today’s changing health care system. In fact, Adventist HealthCare’s Center for Health Equity and Wellness works aggressively to raise awareness of community health needs and local disparities, improve access to culturally appropriate care and provide community wellness outreach and education. “Our mission is focused on supporting Adventist HealthCare in implementing health equity and community wellness approaches that improve population health,” says Marcos Pesquera, executive director of the center. “By partnering with other...

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Oh, Baby!

Posted by on Aug 21, 2014 in Adventist HealthCare & You | Comments Off on Oh, Baby!

Oh, Baby!

Shady Grove Adventist Hospital is the First in Maryland to Earn an International Designation for Breastfeeding Support Breastfeeding has many benefits for both moms and babies, research has shown. However, support and guidance during the first days following birth are critical to begin and continue with breastfeeding long-term. Earlier this year, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital became the first hospital in Maryland and one of only 179 in the U.S. to achieve Baby-Friendly designation through the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children’s Fund. The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative is a global program that encourages and recognizes hospitals that offer an optimal level of care for infant feeding. Only 7.2 percent of babies in the U.S. are born in a Baby-Friendly designated facility. For new and expectant moms, this means extra levels of support and education when they deliver at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital. “Breastfeeding has numerous benefits for babies, including a lower risk of sudden infant death syndrome, diabetes, respiratory and ear infections, skin allergies and obesity later in life,” says Carol Chornock, RN, IBCLC, lactation coordinator at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital. “Our physicians and staff are trained and educated in helping new mothers get off to the best start for breastfeeding.” All of Shady Grove Adventist Hospital’s breastfeeding classes are staffed by certified lactation consultants who specialize in the clinical management of breastfeeding. Shady Grove Adventist Hospital offers extra support to help mothers initiate breastfeeding within one hour of birth. The hospital also has a standard practice of “rooming-in,” which allows mothers and infants to stay together 24 hours a day. “Baby-Friendly truly empowers the mother to be the best mother she can be, regardless of her choice in feeding,” Chornock says. Making the Grade For Prince George’s County High School English teacher Charis Mbugua of Clarksburg and her husband, Peter, manager of planning and market analysis for Adventist HealthCare, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital “made the grade” when they were deciding where to deliver their first child. “I loved the atmosphere,” Mbugua says. “As soon as we finished the tour, I knew this was where we wanted to deliver.” With daily breastfeeding classes for mothers in the hospital, weekday phone support and a free weekly support group, new parents like the Mbuguas have help every step of the way. “I think new mothers are so overwhelmed with all the do’s and don’ts of parenting that it is so helpful to know you will have professionals guiding you and providing support before, during and after the birth,” Mbugua says. The Mbuguas Share Their Birth Experience Read about Charis and Peter Mbugua’s birth experience and learn more about Shady Grove Adventist Hospital’s Baby-Friendly designation. In addition to being Baby-Friendly, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital has obtained gold-level Breastfeeding-Friendly Workplace recognition from the Maryland Breastfeeding Coalition, as well as the International Board of Lactation Consultants Care Award. Support Across the System For moms in southern and eastern Montgomery County, Washington Adventist Hospital in Takoma Park, also a member of Adventist HealthCare, offers comprehensive breastfeeding classes and support at the hospital for new parents. “Breast milk is the optimal food for infants, because it has the correct amount of protein and other nutrients to promote infant growth and development,” says Stacy Andrews MD, Ob-Gyn at Washington Adventist Hospital. “While breastfeeding is linked to...

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Atrial Fibrillation – Be Still My Heart

Posted by on Aug 20, 2014 in Adventist HealthCare & You | Comments Off on Atrial Fibrillation – Be Still My Heart

Atrial Fibrillation – Be Still My Heart

Atrial fibrillation threatened to slow down this former triathlete—that is, until the Washington Adventist Hospital experts restored his rhythm As a former triathlete and husband to a professional runner, 61-year old Thomas Scott of Rockville wasn’t used to taking things slow. That changed when heart problems struck. Since 2012, Scott experienced what he later learned was intermittent atrial fibrillation (a-fib), the most common type of arrhythmia, or abnormal heart rhythm. “All of a sudden, my heart would begin to race,” Scott says. The condition is related to an issue with the heart’s electrical system that causes the two upper parts of the heart, also known as the atria, to quiver, or fibrillate. For Scott, these symptoms would usually last less than three hours and then disappear. Worsening Condition After further a-fib episodes resulted in multiple trips to the Shady Grove Adventist Hospital emergency room, Scott knew he needed to find a solution. Concerned, Marnie Bernard, PA-C, certified physician assistant working in the office of Jonathan Plotsky, MD, in Rockville, referred him to Sean Beinart, MD, electrophysiologist with Washington Adventist and Shady Grove Adventist Hospitals. “I researched several area hospitals’ cardiac programs to compare my options,” Scott says. A radio ad on WTOP persuaded him to visit Washington Adventist Hospital’s website, which at the time featured Guillaume Marçais, a local rock climber whom Dr. Beinart treated with an ablation procedure to correct his a-fib. “I was immediately impressed by Dr. Beinart,” Scott says. “I knew he could fix me like he fixed the rock climber.” The Fix Ablation uses a thin wire called a catheter to deliver heat energy to specific areas of the heart in a safe, precise manner and can help the faulty electrical signals that trigger a-fib. “Cardiac ablation is often the best course of action for a-fib patients who are younger and physically active,” Dr. Beinart says. “We agreed this was the best option to help Tom maintain a high-quality, active lifestyle without the negative side effects that can develop from medication.” Since his successful ablation procedure at Washington Adventist Hospital in November, Scott has been back to enjoying mountain biking, weight lifting and cycling. “I was back to working out within a few weeks!” says Scott, who has a lot to keep him going. “I’m married to an elite athlete, so I better stay in shape.” See Heart Patients Back at What They Enjoy Watch Chris Barritt of Carroll County, former heart tumor surgery patient at Washington Adventist Hospital, continue to thrive as a he sets off on another adventure to tackle his first...

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Mammogram – The Once-a-Year Test That Can Save Your Life

Posted by on Aug 20, 2014 in Adventist HealthCare & You | Comments Off on Mammogram – The Once-a-Year Test That Can Save Your Life

Mammogram – The Once-a-Year Test That Can Save Your Life

If scheduling your yearly mammogram tends to slip off your to-do list, you’re certainly not alone. But the fact remains, you should make this invaluable exam a priority. According to the government’s Office on Women’s Health, a high quality mammogram plus a clinical breast exam performed by a doctor is the most effective way to detect breast cancer early. Schedule your mammogram today by calling the Shady Grove Breast Center at 301-590-8999 or Washington Adventist Hospital at 301-891-5053. Research shows that early detection saves lives. Women diagnosed with breast cancer at stage 1 (a low severity) have a nearly 90 percent survival rate, according to the American Cancer Society; women with stage 4 breast cancer (the highest severity), however, have a 15 percent chance of living another five years. Who Needs a Mammogram? The American Cancer Society recommends annual mammograms for women starting at age 40. In addition, a clinical breast exam should be given about every three years for women in their 20s and 30s and every year for women age 40 and older. Starting in their 20s, women should also conduct breast self-exams. Doctors may recommend some women with a family history of breast cancer, a genetic tendency or other factor be screened with MRI in addition to a mammogram. “I believe every woman needs a screening protocol tailored to her individual health needs,” says Sonya Kella, MD, breast radiologist and medical director of the Shady Grove Breast Center. “Risk assessment and breast density evaluation play key roles in establishing a new standard of care. Women should talk to their doctors about risk factors and the right tests.” What’s All This Talk About ‘Digital’? Mammograms can detect changes in the breast that may be early signs of cancer but are too small or subtle to be felt. State-of-the-art digital mammography equipment uses high-resolution computers and specially designed digital detectors to produce the highest-quality images. “With digital mammography, doctors can adjust the brightness, change contrast and zoom in for close-ups of specific areas of interest,” says Kristine Dettloff, MD, breast radiologist at the Shady Grove Breast Center. “Compared to older film-based systems, digital mammography can greatly reduce the need for image retakes, which potentially saves patients additional time in the exam room and reduces exposure to X-rays.” COMING SOON: Adventist HealthCare will expand services in the community with the opening of the Adventist HealthCare White Oak Breast Center this fall under the leadership of Sonya Kella, MD, and Kristine Dettloff, MD. This full-service facility integrates screenings, diagnosis and treatment into one convenient location for our community. It’s just one more reason to choose Adventist HealthCare to help you live life...

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Cancer Care, Continued

Posted by on Aug 20, 2014 in Adventist HealthCare & You | Comments Off on Cancer Care, Continued

Cancer Care, Continued

Aquilino Cancer Center’s Healing Touch Extends with Specialized Therapy Barbara Homon, 71, of Derwood, Md., is an inspiration to those she meets. After undergoing treatment for breast cancer in 2009, she developed lymphedema, a common side effect for cancer patients who have lymph nodes removed. She now works diligently to keep her lymphedema well-controlled by receiving regular therapy at the Shady Grove Adventist Aquilino Cancer Center. After experiencing many aspects of cancer care, she gives the rehabilitation services at the cancer center, which opened in November 2013, two thumbs up. “I’ve been able to establish relationships with others who share a similar journey…” “The setting at the Aquilino Cancer Center promotes community among patients and their families,” Homon says. “I’ve been able to establish relationships with others who share a similar journey, and my husband loves the peaceful and inviting waiting area.” A team from Adventist Rehabilitation Hospital of Maryland provides expert care to patients in the Aquilino Cancer Center. The specialized therapy can alleviate side effects from cancer treatment, like fatigue, pain, fibrosis and lymphedema. “Cancer and its treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation, can affect speech, occupational or physical abilities,” explains Jennifer Nulton, OTR/L, CHT, CLT, Homon’s lymphedema therapist. “Rehabilitation helps minimize symptoms and improve quality of life.” Quality of life is important to Homon, whose cheerful, upbeat nature is contagious. She says the Aquilino Cancer Center’s private rooms and dedicated therapists allow patients to comfortably talk about sensitive topics, like weight gain and how the lymphedema garments make them feel. Services and support groups are also available within the center to meet the emotional and spiritual needs of patients. Homon’s latest round of therapy proved especially challenging, lasting five months. Yet, through it all, the Aquilino Cancer Center team provided the physical and mental support she needed. “Jennifer kept me settled when I thought we were out of options,” Homon says. Treating Lymphedema Lymphedema is a condition where lymph nodes are blocked or damaged, causing arms, legs or other body parts to swell. Some people are born with abnormalities of their lymphatic system. Others may develop lymphedema due to cancer treatment, injury, complications from obesity, circulatory problems or a parasite known as filariasis. There is no cure for lymphedema. The most effective treatment, complete decongestive therapy (CDT), is offered in the Shady Grove Adventist Aquilino Cancer Center. CDT involves a combination of manual lymph drainage massage, shortstretch compression bandaging, exercise and skin care. During phase one, CDT is performed daily until the reduction of fluid reaches a plateau. Phase two, the maintenance phase, involves self-management and compression...

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Oh Baby! Welcome, Micah!

Posted by on Aug 19, 2014 in Adventist HealthCare & You | Comments Off on Oh Baby! Welcome, Micah!

Oh Baby! Welcome, Micah!

Our fall magazine highlights the story of Charis and Peter Mbugua of Clarksburg, expectant parents in the midst of planning their delivery at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital. Between writing this story and the issue going to print, the Mbuguas welcomed their first child, a son named Micah, at 9:32 p.m. on May 17. He weighed six pounds, 10 ounces. Charis, a Montgomery County Public School teacher, said she knew right after touring the hospital’s Birth Center that she wanted to deliver there. When the day came, doctors and nurses delivered Micah through an unplanned cesarean. Though unexpected, Charis and Peter say, “We felt that we were given the type of attention and information we needed to feel confident going into surgery. A couple days after the C-section, the anesthesiologist who was present during our labor and delivery actually came to visit our room just to see how we were doing!” During her stay, Charis went to the hospital’s breastfeeding class. There, she collected educational materials that she was able to look at once at home. Just weeks before Charis delivered, Shady Grove Adventist became the first hospital in Maryland to achieve Baby-Friendly designation through the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children’s Fund. This recognizes the hospital’s extensive breastfeeding support. In addition to this guidance, Charis praised the nurses’ help during her recovery, even adding that she “secretly didn’t want to leave.” Today, Micah is three months old and his parents describe him as “13 pounds, eight ounces of chubby cuteness!” To other expecting parents, they say, “You can’t go wrong delivering at Shady Grove. In fact, if you can, we suggest you do deliver there. It makes the transition into parenthood so much...

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Adventist HealthCare Wins 10 National Marketing Awards

Posted by on May 7, 2014 in Adventist HealthCare & You | Comments Off on Adventist HealthCare Wins 10 National Marketing Awards

Adventist HealthCare Wins 10 National Marketing Awards

We’re very pleased to announce that Adventist HealthCare has received a combined 10 distinguished marketing awards for video, advertising campaign and website design work in 2013. The Aster Awards The first set of awards is The Aster Awards, a medical marketing awards program allowing health-care organizations and advertising agencies to compete against similarly sized competitors from across the nation and world. Adventist HealthCare received: Gold Award, TV/Video Advertising: “Two Hips, Two Weeks” featuring a Shady Grove Adventist Hospital joint replacement patient. Gold Award, Radio Advertising: Shady Grove Adventist Hospital Lung Cancer Radio Spot http://ahc.cachefly.net/SGAH/audio/20140507-WTOP-SGAH-Lung Cancer WTOP Radio Spot.mp3 Gold Award, Service Line – Cancer: Shady Grove Adventist Hospital Lung Cancer Campaign   Silver Award, Outdoor Transit Series: Washington Adventist Hospital Cardiac Campaign Bronze Award, Radio Series Advertising: Washington Adventist Hospital Cardiac Campaign   http://ahc.cachefly.net/WAH/audio/2014-CV-TrustedHeartCare-Kris.mp3 Bronze Award, Website: www.AdventistHealthCare.com The Communicator Awards The second set of awards is the Communicator Awards, a leading international creative awards program honoring creative excellence for communication professionals. The 2014 Communicator Awards received more than 6,000 entries from ad agencies, interactive agencies, production firms, in-house creative professionals, graphic designers, design firms, and public relations firms. Adventist HealthCare received: Silver Award of Distinction, Online Video and Branded Content: “Two Hips, Two Weeks,” featuring a Shady Grove Adventist Hospital joint replacement patient. Silver Award of Distinction, Online Video and Branded Content: “It’s All in the Wrist,” featuring a Washington Adventist Hospital transradial catheterization patient. Silver Award of Distinction, Integrated Campaign – Washington Adventist Hospital “Trusted Heart Care” campaign Silver Award of Distinction, Commercials – Washington Adventist Hospital “Trusted Heart Care” radio commercials featuring past patients   http://ahc.cachefly.net/WAH/audio/2013-CV-TrustedHeartCare-Gordon.mp3 & http://ahc.cachefly.net/WAH/audio/2012-CV-TrustedHeartCare-Garrett.mp3 Adventist HealthCare was one of very few companies among thousands of entries that did not use an outside advertising agency when producing these projects. A special thank you to our former patients for sharing their powerful stories with the...

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Baby on the Way!

Posted by on Mar 6, 2014 in Adventist HealthCare & You | Comments Off on Baby on the Way!

Baby on the Way!

Experts answer common questions on pregnancy and maternity care Q. What is “full term”? In 2013, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine issued new definitions to explain the duration, or “term,” of a woman’s pregnancy. Early term: 37 weeks, 0 days, to 38 weeks, 6 days Full term: 39 weeks, 0 days, to 40 weeks, 6 days Late term: 41 weeks, 0 days, to 41 weeks, 6 days Post-term: 42 weeks, 0 days and beyond The guidelines were created in response to the trend of inducing labor or scheduling a cesarean delivery earlier than 39 weeks when not medically necessary. “Pregnant women should look at these definitions as guidelines, not rules, and keep an open dialogue with their doctor,” says Kimberly Campbell, MD, chair of the Department of OB-GYN at Washington Adventist Hospital. “Every pregnancy and labor is unique, but the underlying message is it’s best to let nature take its course unless there’s a medical reason not to.” Q. Can I use a midwife when I deliver at the hospital? “Many expectant moms I work with are happy to learn they can use a midwife and deliver at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital,” says Kathy Schaaf, birth advisor at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital. “A midwife can be a great option for a woman looking for a very personalized, holistic approach to pregnancy, labor and delivery.” Shady Grove Adventist Hospital works with the certified nurse midwives at Midwifery Care Associates. Midwives work with other members of the health care team, such as physicians and nurses, to provide the highest-quality care. Schaaf explains that a midwife will encourage and support a woman’s desire to have an unmedicated birth experience and also o er guidance and knowledge if the birth plan changes along the way. Q. Will I be supported in my choice to breastfeed? “No matter how a mother chooses to feed her child, our team is here to support that mother and serve as a resource,” Schaaf says. In fact, for those who choose to breastfeed, the Birth Center at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital is on path to become one of the first “baby-friendly” hospitals in Maryland designated by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children’s Fund. Hospitals must follow 10 steps to become baby-friendly and support all moms, including those who choose to breastfeed their babies. These steps include: Helping mothers initiate breastfeeding within one hour of birth. Practicing “rooming in” (keeping mothers and infants together 24 hours a day). Training all health care staff in the skills necessary to implement the breastfeeding...

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Keeping Score of Concussions

Posted by on Mar 6, 2014 in Adventist HealthCare & You | Comments Off on Keeping Score of Concussions

Keeping Score of Concussions

Test helps doctors diagnose and treat head injuries in student-athletes As head injuries become an increasing concern in sports, Adventist Rehabilitation Hospital of Maryland is working with Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) to improve concussion diagnosis and treatment. The result of the partnership is a program, which began last fall, that requires all high school athletes to take a preseason baseline exam every two years using a computerized tool called ImPACT™. “ImPACT measures cognitive functions such as memory, processing speed and reaction time,” says Shital Pavawalla, PhD, neuropsychologist and clinical director of the Concussion Assessment and Management Program at Adventist Rehabilitation Hospital of Maryland. “The baseline exam results can be compared with post-injury tests to aid in diagnosis and to help determine an appropriate treatment plan.” Adventist Rehabilitation Hospital of Maryland provides exams at 13 of the 25 Montgomery County high schools, testing more than 8,000 athletes this past school year. Next year, the hospital anticipates providing about 2,000 additional tests to freshmen and new athletes. In addition to the MCPS partnership, Adventist Rehabilitation offers a comprehensive concussion clinic for adolescents and adults, ages 14 and older, who have experienced a concussion injury from any trauma, including from sports, motor vehicle accidents or...

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Not Just Another Day at the Park

Posted by on Mar 6, 2014 in Adventist HealthCare & You | Comments Off on Not Just Another Day at the Park

Not Just Another Day at the Park

After suffering from heart trouble during a morning run, one Lanham man was saved—and restored This past June, Sandra Roberts and Beatrice Yeawon, patient care technicians at Washington Adventist Hospital, began their morning with a routine walk around Lake Artemesia in College Park. On that particular day, however, their presence had a much greater impact than they could have ever imagined. They turned a corner to find a jogger collapsed on the ground. Another bystander was already calling 9-1-1. “I immediately ran over to check on the man,” Roberts says. “After finding he had no pulse, I started doing CPR.” Roberts and Yeawon took turns administering chest compressions until an ambulance arrived to take the man to the Emergency Department (ED) at Washington Adventist Hospital. The jogger was Jerry Farmer, a 56-year-old from Lanham who was suffering from sudden cardiac arrest, which generally occurs as a result of an electrical disturbance in the heart and prevents blood flow to the rest of the body. If not treated immediately, this condition can lead to sudden cardiac death. Three Blockages The next several days were critical for Farmer. Expert care and coordination between the ED and the intensive care unit helped to stabilize Farmer, and he fully regained consciousness. Farmer then underwent a cardiac catheterization procedure in an effort to identify the cause of his arrest. “After locating three critical blockages in his heart arteries, we performed an angioplasty and placed three stents,” says Anees Ahsan, MD, interventional cardiologist at Washington Adventist Hospital. “This minimally invasive procedure uses a small balloon guided across a narrowing in the artery and inflates to unblock the artery, which very significantly reduces the possibility of the blockage returning.” To correct Farmer’s irregular heartbeat and prevent future episodes of cardiac arrest, Pirooz Mofrad, MD, electrophysiologist and medical director of electrophysiology at Washington Adventist Hospital, then inserted an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) within Farmer’s heart. “The ICD is an electronic device used to monitor heart rhythm and delivers energy to the heart muscle to help it beat in a normal sequence,” Dr. Mofrad explains. “This device gives people with damaged hearts a second chance at a normal life.” A Grateful Patient Now safely back to work, Farmer credits Roberts, Yeawon and the entire medical team at Washington Adventist Hospital for saving him. “The care was exceptional,” he says. “I can’t thank Beatrice and Sandra enough for saving my life,” Farmer adds. “Without their medical expertise, the outcome would have been very different.” How is Your Heart? Take a Free Risk Assessment Visit www.trustedheartcare.com to take a FREE heart health risk assessment and review your results with a nurse at Washington Adventist...

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