Even though little computer chips have now taken over much of the drudgery of resetting the clocks on Sunday to “spring ahead” an hour, there are still one or two that will require my attention. As I work my way through the house, trying not to miss anything and trying to remember how to reset each device, it may be tempting to grumble a bit about the loss of an hour and why we have this biannual disruption in our lives anyway. (Thanks, Ben Franklin.)

But frankly, I’ve already decided how to resist the temptation to complain. I hope I am awake enough to remember that wonderful little text in the Psalms that is actually a prayer we all can offer.  It asks a simple Sunday morning question of God, “Will you not revive us again, that your people may rejoice in you?” (Psalm 85:6, NIV).

It is actually a plea: “Revive us again!”

Revive is a word that is associated with restore, renew, and repair.  Those words are hopeful and full of promise. Revive means to awaken or energize, to pay attention. It puts the past behind us and refocuses our thoughts on the future. It is a word filled with promise. It springs ahead.

“Revive us again, that your people may rejoice in you!”

This is a prayer of hope, a prayer that sees the future.  This is a request that our lives be framed with joy and peace instead of uncertainty.  And when there are fears and uncertainties, when things are changing constantly, it is a reminder of God’s wonderful grace that is also the agent for our change and renewal—our revival. It is a call to rediscover in our lives the evidence of God’s grace in which our hearts can rejoice.

[And speaking of change: don’t forget to change the batteries in your smoke detector.  This is a good time to revive and renew them for the spring and summer ahead.]