This week is World Breast Feeding Week! We’re celebrating by supporting nursing mothers and babies and by helping you understand the benefits of breastfeeding.

“The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that moms should continue to breastfeed until their baby is at least 12 months old,” said Veronica Linares, MD, FAAP, a pediatric medicine physician with Adventist Medical Group. Mothers should continue breastfeeding even as additional foods, such as baby food and rice cereal, are introduced into their diet.”

Breastfed Babies…

  • Receive essential nutrients and calories to stay healthy.
  • Tend to have strengthened immune systems and are less likely to get ear infections, diarrhea, respiratory infections and other illnesses.
  • Have an easier time digesting the breastmilk.
  • Have a readily available source of food.

Breastfeeding Mothers…

  • Create a special physical connection with baby.
  • Release hormones that promote “mothering” behavior.
  • Have a lower risk of getting ovarian cancer, breast cancer and osteoporosis.
  • Burn more calories after pregnancy.
  • Retains higher levels of iron after pregnancy.
  • Save money.

Breastfeeding & Work

Going back to work after having a baby can be tricky. Speak with your supervisor about your needs and expectations before coming back full time.

Tips for Returning to Work

  • Prep your baby for drinking milk out of a bottle before you return
  • Get a quality breast pump
  • Find a private place to express milk.
  • Bring a photo or video of your baby to help with the milk “let down” process
  • Use a cooler with ice packs to transport your milk home after your shift

Sample At-Work Pumping Schedule

8:00am Begin Work
9:45am-10:00am Use Break to Express Milk
12:00pm Lunch Break & Express Milk
2:30pm-2:45pm Use Break to Express Milk
5:00pm Leave Work

 

Sources: The American Academy of Pediatrics, World Health Organization, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, HRSA. The Health Tip of the Week is for educational purposes only.  For additional information, consult your physician. Please feel free to copy and distribute this health resource.